The Piece That Doesn't Fit

Derek Hale appreciation lifestyle

64 notes &

goddammitstacey:

survivablyso:

goddammitstacey:

suaine:

goddammitstacey:

There needs to be an “avoid at all costs” option on goodreads

A lot of the “oh you must read that it has queer stuff in it” tends to be exactly the sort I try to avoid, well-intentioned but really just feeding into existing stereotypes and the tragedy of our existence.

My best friend reads a lot of books these days and to this day I think she’s come across exactly one thing that was up my alley.

I’m specifically aiming for sci-fi/fantasy because a) it’s my jam and b) that tends to weed out a lot of the Oh The Tragedy Of Being Teh Gay! stories that dominate the reality-based market.

My biggest pitfalls now seem to be a depressing dearth of decent writing and a frankly terrifying amount of dub con/flat out rape.

Sorry to butt into your convo but just wanted to recommend the book Hero by Perry Moore. It’s a gay superhero book where his being gay is more of a subplot than anything else. It ends with happiness. If he wrote a million sequels I would read them all!

I have Hero on my shortlist actually! I’ll definitely bump it up, thanks for the rec!

Oh yes, sci-fi and fantasy is definitely and forever my jam as well. If you’re into the more sci-fi-y bit, which is frankly my jamest jam of all the jams, might I recommend “Dreamer” by Steven Harper? It comes with a definite trigger warning (suicide/depression and some mind control) but that is related to the plot of the book and does not affect either of the main guys. I liked the female characters very much, definitely enjoyed the romance part (it’s post-breakup getting back together but the second novel is a prequel) because it was meaningful to the hero journey, the plot itself was something I hadn’t seen before.

There’s only one major drawback and that’s that the author is, I think, white American? And the main character of the book as well as the underlying worldbuilding are Australian aboriginal and I don’t know enough to be able to say if he handled it entirely respectfully. It felt empowering to me, but I’m obviously not someone who can judge that.

It’s currently available for 1.17$ on amazon kindle, which is definitely less than the book is worth to me just for the fact that it’s a fun read, has interesting non-US world-building, many and varied POC and queer and female characters, and an ending that made me want to read more.

64 notes &

goddammitstacey:

There needs to be an “avoid at all costs” option on goodreads

A lot of the “oh you must read that it has queer stuff in it” tends to be exactly the sort I try to avoid, well-intentioned but really just feeding into existing stereotypes and the tragedy of our existence.

My best friend reads a lot of books these days and to this day I think she’s come across exactly one thing that was up my alley.

2 notes &

I think there may be something wrong with me, but I’m really enjoying the new Doctor Who episodes. The first one was a bit meh, but both the second and third resonated with me.

So. There’s that.

5 notes &

When your depression outpaces your desire to see your friends, JR and Hoechlin, things are probably pretty bad.

17 notes &

jamiesugah:

So I no longer write for the site.

I’d rather not talk about it, I’m still emotional about it, but I wanted you guys to know.

And now all of my articles are attributed to someone else.

That is so fucked up :(

4,731,820 notes &

inritum:

reblog and make a wish!this was removed from tumbrl due to “violating one or more of Tumblr’s Community Guidelines”, but since my wish came true the first time, I’m putting it back. :)

A little extra magic can’t hurt.

inritum:

reblog and make a wish!


this was removed from tumbrl due to “violating one or more of Tumblr’s Community Guidelines”, but since my wish came true the first time, I’m putting it back. :)

A little extra magic can’t hurt.

2 notes &

Oh, I forgot to mention this before the weekend, but it’s hilarious.

My boss lady discovered the magic of cupcake cakes.

If you’ve ever followed Cake Wrecks, you know why this made me laugh. And cry. Because she was damn serious.

21 notes &

I think, frankly, that one of the most important messages any teen, but especially queer, female or POC teens, needs to hear is that they matter. They are growing up in a world where they are judged by how valuable they will be to society, how they can be of use.

What any teen, any child, and even most of us adults need to hear, is that you, as an individual, are important and irreplaceable. That when you are gone, we will miss you, and no one can take your place.

And that, I think, is where Teen Wolf’s biggest transgression lies in season 3 and season 4. The way it has treated characters like exchangable Barbie dolls who can be dropped into plot points and then thrown away; the way it has completely glossed over the grief over Erica, Boyd, and Allison; the way it will dump character continuity for the sake of more explosions, slow motion fight scenes and objectifying sex scenes; the way a character can just disappear from the story and the story doesn’t care - that is in itself a reflection of what society thinks of us. And it is a message that is damaging to an extent I’m not sure the creators are aware of.

I think Jeff Davis truly did set out to create a story told in a world that was better than ours, but through a set of circumstances that I’m not qualified to judge, he ended up giving us this message:

You don’t matter. Someone can always take your place. The machine will move on.

But the machine has stumbled. The machine has stuttered and slowed as it crept over our bones, and what happens now is up in the air.

We can only do what we always do - tell our own stories, raise our voices. Perhaps MTV won’t deign to hear us, but I assure you someone will. And one day, we can all be heroes and queens, and our identites will matter, but they won’t be our burden and our tragedy.

Filed under teen wolf for ts

193 notes &

eaddymays:

notanotherteenwolfpodcast:

Not even a week into hiatus and we’re planning an episode for you guys! In fact, this is my (Courtney) first episode to really take charge of and I’m incredible excited about it! Hopefully I’m able to help put together a good episode for you all!
This episode is going to all about Fan Fiction. Now, if you’ve been to any events lately with the lovely Eaddy Mays as a guest, you’ve probably heard her speak on the topic. So when the idea of this episode came to mind, she was the first person we wanted to reach out to!
Some of the things we hope to discuss include, but are not limited to: fan fiction in the media, fan fiction in relation to the “talent”, and the overall importance of fan fiction. 
Now onto the fun part! There are two ways you guys can be involved with this episode!
Submit a question to us/Eaddy to discuss during the episode! Depending on how long things run, we hope to grab a few questions from you guys to answer and discuss!
Take 15-20 seconds and record an audio clip of you telling us why you read/write fan fiction. Then email that clip to us at natwpodcast at gmail dot com. You may hear yourself in this episode!
You have the next week to get your questions and audio clips in! After September 20th, we will no longer be able to accept them (plus, we are allowing ourselves ample time to edit this episode).
If you have any questions for us about any of the above, please feel free to submit an ask and we will do our best to address them!


Ohhhh, yessssss!
This is gonna be …a most …. notable event. You might want to be sure your headphones are plugged in….just saying.
And you thought I was protective and scary on tv! Wait til we start talking about the unjust treatment of fandom.Yeah, s’bout to get REAL.
This is Not Another NotAnotherTeenWolfPodcast.
Count on it.

eaddymays:

notanotherteenwolfpodcast:

Not even a week into hiatus and we’re planning an episode for you guys! In fact, this is my (Courtney) first episode to really take charge of and I’m incredible excited about it! Hopefully I’m able to help put together a good episode for you all!

This episode is going to all about Fan Fiction. Now, if you’ve been to any events lately with the lovely Eaddy Mays as a guest, you’ve probably heard her speak on the topic. So when the idea of this episode came to mind, she was the first person we wanted to reach out to!

Some of the things we hope to discuss include, but are not limited to: fan fiction in the media, fan fiction in relation to the “talent”, and the overall importance of fan fiction. 

Now onto the fun part! There are two ways you guys can be involved with this episode!

  1. Submit a question to us/Eaddy to discuss during the episode! Depending on how long things run, we hope to grab a few questions from you guys to answer and discuss!
  2. Take 15-20 seconds and record an audio clip of you telling us why you read/write fan fiction. Then email that clip to us at natwpodcast at gmail dot com. You may hear yourself in this episode!

You have the next week to get your questions and audio clips in! After September 20th, we will no longer be able to accept them (plus, we are allowing ourselves ample time to edit this episode).

If you have any questions for us about any of the above, please feel free to submit an ask and we will do our best to address them!

Ohhhh, yessssss!

This is gonna be …a most …. notable event. You might want to be sure your headphones are plugged in….just saying.

And you thought I was protective and scary on tv! Wait til we start talking about the unjust treatment of fandom.
Yeah, s’bout to get REAL.

This is Not Another NotAnotherTeenWolfPodcast.

Count on it.

202 notes &

fyeahcopyright:

In the last few days, a number of Teen Wolf fanartists with stores on RedBubble have posted/tweeted about takedowns by RedBubble of some of the items in their stores. From what we’ve been told, all the items either had “Teen Wolf” in the tags, in the item or store description and/or in the item/store title.
This is not the first time RedBubble has taken down merch and sent an email to the store operator stating that they were taken down after RedBubble ”having received a complaint from [major multinational rightsholder], the claimed owner or licensee of related intellectual property, and in accordance with Redbubble’s IP/Publicity Rights Policy.”
Back in 2003, CafePress took down fanart inspired by the Harry Potter characters from HPEF’s Nimbus - 2003 fancon store, because the site’s bot did some image recognition thing and CP’s policy was to take things down if the image matched up with images submitted by the copyright and/or trademark-holders. We replied to CafePress, explained that the works were transformative works and didn’t have any trademarks on them, and they were put back up shortly thereafter. Similar things have happened over the past 11 years. Every single popular show/film/brand/band/comic/series is included by CP and RB in their “usage review” systems.
As CP said in a recent annual report, ” We maintain content usage review systems that, through a combination of manual and automated blocks, monitor potentially infringing content of which we become aware.” Redbubble said something similar this summer:

Although we’re not required by law, we take further proactive efforts on many occasions and work closely with numerous content owners, brands and individual artists to minimize instances of third party infringement of intellectual property rights via the Redbubble marketplace. 

They don’t always notify the copyrightholders or trademark owners; CP and RB’s bots check the images and the descriptions and take things down just because the IP owner has put their brands and sometimes their art into the CP and RB content management system. That doesn’t mean there aren’t “false positives” - the content management system doesn’t check for fair use or parodies or commentary/criticism, and we’ll explain how to make them aware of that below.
The laws in the US regarding transformative works and copyright infringement have expanded over the last decade to define more things as Fair Use - and the bots that stores like CafePress and RedBubble use have become more precise; they’re similar to “Search By Image” on google. However, the laws regarding trademark infringement in this sort of situation are relatively unchanged.
Fanart is fair use; we posted extensively about noncommercially distributed fanart back in January. Selling fan art may also be fair use as a matter of law, for purposes of determining whether it infringes on someone else’s copyright.  However, even if a work is fair use under copyright law, selling it in connection with someone else’s trademarks may constitute trademark infringement.
It’s not a given - it won’t always. If the marks are used descriptively, if they’re used to compare things, etc., it may not be trademark infringement. But you are less likely to get a takedown notice if you don’t include tags that are a show or film or band’s trademark - use a shortened version of the show title (TW, ST, SPN, AOS, etc.) or a ship name or a character’s last name instead.
If you do get a takedown notice and you think that what’s been taken down is fair use, you are allowed to respond and explain why the work is noninfringing. You can discuss these factors:
1. The purpose and character of the work (Is the fanart transformative? Was it made for non-commercial purposes? Selling something on RB impacts on this factor, but it’s not the only element at issue, especially if the fanart doesn’t replicate something seen on screen or in a comic strip panel.)
2. The amount and substantiality of the copyrighted work used (How much of the copyrighted work was used and why was it used? For fanart, usually little if any of the copyrighted work was used.)
3. The effect on the market of the copyrighted work (Will the work be used as a substitute for the original copyrighted work or impact the market for sales of merchandise related to the original copyrighted work?)
You also might want to include language inspired by this:

As fair use is a lawful use of a third party’s copyright, to the extent that this art uses another’s copyright, it should be deemed fair use under 17 USC 107 because it is (a) transformative and (b) does not adversely affect the market or potential market of the original work or derivative works. When determining if fair use is applicable and thus a work noninfringing, the central purpose of said investigation [into purpose and character of use] is to see … whether the new work merely “supersede[s] the objects” of the original creation, or instead adds something new, with a further purpose or different character, altering the first with new expression, meaning, or message; it asks, in other words, whether and to what extent the new work is “transformative.” Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, Inc., 510 U.S. 569, 579, 114 S.Ct. 1164, 127 L.Ed.2d 500 (1994), Zomba Enterprises, Inc.; Zomba Songs, Inc., Plaintiffs-Appellees, v. Panorama Records, Inc., Defendant-Appellant., 491 F.3d 574 (6th Cir. 2007).

 Takedowns like this happen all the time; they happen when they’re justifiable because someone’s uploaded a show-created poster as a Redbubble tote bag or CafePress coaster, they happen when someone “markets” their fanart using a trademark that the show’s creators or distributors own, and they happen when works are completely noncommercial and only on display. Absent other information, it’s not practical to assume that it’s part of a crackdown on specific artists or ships, and with regard to what’s happened to some Teen Wolf artists this week, it’s impossible to even know if the takedowns were because the trademarks were used, or because of the images themselves. We’d love more info, though - so if your art has been taken down on RedBubble and you weren’t using Teen Wolf - or any character names - in the tags or descriptions, and you’ve submitted a “Fair Use” counternotice, and it still hasn’t gone back up even though a few business days have passed, please let us know and we’ll see if we can learn more.

fyeahcopyright:

In the last few days, a number of Teen Wolf fanartists with stores on RedBubble have posted/tweeted about takedowns by RedBubble of some of the items in their stores. From what we’ve been told, all the items either had “Teen Wolf” in the tags, in the item or store description and/or in the item/store title.

This is not the first time RedBubble has taken down merch and sent an email to the store operator stating that they were taken down after RedBubble ”having received a complaint from [major multinational rightsholder], the claimed owner or licensee of related intellectual property, and in accordance with Redbubble’s IP/Publicity Rights Policy.”

Back in 2003, CafePress took down fanart inspired by the Harry Potter characters from HPEF’s Nimbus - 2003 fancon store, because the site’s bot did some image recognition thing and CP’s policy was to take things down if the image matched up with images submitted by the copyright and/or trademark-holders. We replied to CafePress, explained that the works were transformative works and didn’t have any trademarks on them, and they were put back up shortly thereafter. Similar things have happened over the past 11 years. Every single popular show/film/brand/band/comic/series is included by CP and RB in their “usage review” systems.

As CP said in a recent annual report, ” We maintain content usage review systems that, through a combination of manual and automated blocks, monitor potentially infringing content of which we become aware.” Redbubble said something similar this summer:

Although we’re not required by law, we take further proactive efforts on many occasions and work closely with numerous content owners, brands and individual artists to minimize instances of third party infringement of intellectual property rights via the Redbubble marketplace.

They don’t always notify the copyrightholders or trademark owners; CP and RB’s bots check the images and the descriptions and take things down just because the IP owner has put their brands and sometimes their art into the CP and RB content management system. That doesn’t mean there aren’t “false positives” - the content management system doesn’t check for fair use or parodies or commentary/criticism, and we’ll explain how to make them aware of that below.

The laws in the US regarding transformative works and copyright infringement have expanded over the last decade to define more things as Fair Use - and the bots that stores like CafePress and RedBubble use have become more precise; they’re similar to “Search By Image” on google. However, the laws regarding trademark infringement in this sort of situation are relatively unchanged.

Fanart is fair use; we posted extensively about noncommercially distributed fanart back in January. Selling fan art may also be fair use as a matter of law, for purposes of determining whether it infringes on someone else’s copyright.  However, even if a work is fair use under copyright law, selling it in connection with someone else’s trademarks may constitute trademark infringement.

It’s not a given - it won’t always. If the marks are used descriptively, if they’re used to compare things, etc., it may not be trademark infringement. But you are less likely to get a takedown notice if you don’t include tags that are a show or film or band’s trademark - use a shortened version of the show title (TW, ST, SPN, AOS, etc.) or a ship name or a character’s last name instead.

If you do get a takedown notice and you think that what’s been taken down is fair use, you are allowed to respond and explain why the work is noninfringing. You can discuss these factors:

1. The purpose and character of the work (Is the fanart transformative? Was it made for non-commercial purposes? Selling something on RB impacts on this factor, but it’s not the only element at issue, especially if the fanart doesn’t replicate something seen on screen or in a comic strip panel.)

2. The amount and substantiality of the copyrighted work used (How much of the copyrighted work was used and why was it used? For fanart, usually little if any of the copyrighted work was used.)

3. The effect on the market of the copyrighted work (Will the work be used as a substitute for the original copyrighted work or impact the market for sales of merchandise related to the original copyrighted work?)

You also might want to include language inspired by this:

As fair use is a lawful use of a third party’s copyright, to the extent that this art uses another’s copyright, it should be deemed fair use under 17 USC 107 because it is (a) transformative and (b) does not adversely affect the market or potential market of the original work or derivative works. When determining if fair use is applicable and thus a work noninfringing, the central purpose of said investigation [into purpose and character of use] is to see … whether the new work merely “supersede[s] the objects” of the original creation, or instead adds something new, with a further purpose or different character, altering the first with new expression, meaning, or message; it asks, in other words, whether and to what extent the new work is “transformative.” Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, Inc., 510 U.S. 569, 579, 114 S.Ct. 1164, 127 L.Ed.2d 500 (1994), Zomba Enterprises, Inc.; Zomba Songs, Inc., Plaintiffs-Appellees, v. Panorama Records, Inc., Defendant-Appellant., 491 F.3d 574 (6th Cir. 2007).

 Takedowns like this happen all the time; they happen when they’re justifiable because someone’s uploaded a show-created poster as a Redbubble tote bag or CafePress coaster, they happen when someone “markets” their fanart using a trademark that the show’s creators or distributors own, and they happen when works are completely noncommercial and only on display. Absent other information, it’s not practical to assume that it’s part of a crackdown on specific artists or ships, and with regard to what’s happened to some Teen Wolf artists this week, it’s impossible to even know if the takedowns were because the trademarks were used, or because of the images themselves. We’d love more info, though - so if your art has been taken down on RedBubble and you weren’t using Teen Wolf - or any character names - in the tags or descriptions, and you’ve submitted a “Fair Use” counternotice, and it still hasn’t gone back up even though a few business days have passed, please let us know and we’ll see if we can learn more.

(via girleverafter)

Filed under teen wolf for ts copyright for anyone affected

7 notes &

arineat:

suaine:

that….seems really low, but I have no context?

They have just passed a law for a general minimum wage in Germany that covers everyone except apprentices and grants every worker 8,50€ an hour.

Even for apprentices, our bosses pay so little that we are over a third away from the line that would mean we had to pay social security, health insurance or taxes. We get so little that we would be eligible for social security, if we were willing to lay all our assets bare and liquidate all our savings.

Last year I had to pay about 50€ a month to drive to school an hour away. That was about a fifth of my entire wages.

I can only afford to do anything at all because my mother is a saint and a superstar who lets me live with her and feeds me and gives me money for my work clothes.

OMG, that’s seriously low! How is that legal? Like..what’s different about apprentices that you guys get so little?

Technically, nothing is different. It’s just that it’s legally considered an extension of schooling rather than work, even though by third year you’re doing exactly the work a finished journeyman would do.

Granted, our apprentice wages are EXCEPTIONALLY low because of a combination of regional differences (wages in the East are lower), branch of trade (bakers and pastry chefs/patissiers are one of the lowest paid jobs in the country), no trade/wage agreement or union.

I enjoy the work I do very, very much and I am happier than I have ever been with the thought of becoming a therapist, but this is a true drawback that makes my life decidedly harder.